Campus Units

Agronomy

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

2019

Journal or Book Title

Agronomy Journal

Volume

111

Issue

4

First Page

1

Last Page

16

DOI

10.2134/agronj2018.09.0621

Abstract

Studies are limited that focus on change in concentration and accumulation of secondary and micronutrients in corn (Zea mays L.) plant fractions and across corn hybrid development periods. This research was conducted in 2007 and 2008 to evaluate the partitioning of secondary and micronutrients across vegetative and reproductive stages at the plant-fraction level for 1960- and 2000-era hybrids. Two popular hybrids for each era were grown, with measurement of nutrient concentration and content in several plant and grain fractions. Secondary and micronutrient concentrations in plant fractions were lower in 2000- than 1960-era hybrids with most nutrients, except ear shoots and tassels for certain nutrients. However, nutrient content was consistently greater in 2000- compared to 1960-era hybrids in the whole plant and fractions at most development stages, except tassels and ear shoots. In tassels, nutrient content was mostly smaller in 2000-era hybrids, but in ear shoots content was similar. The accumulation rates of most nutrients per growing degree day (GDD) were greater in the reproductive period for 2000-era hybrids, but similar among eras in the vegetative period. Remobilized nutrients from vegetative to reproductive components were similar between era hybrids, except Ca and Fe, and positive except Fe, Mn, and B. It is apparent that greater nutrient content in newer hybrids was driven mainly by associated nutrient uptake rates and greater dry matter (DM). Despite the greater nutrient content with the modern hybrids, removal with grain or stover harvest would still be small for S and micronutrients.

Comments

This article is published as Woli, K. P., J. E. Sawyer, M. J. Boyer, L. J. Abendroth, and R. W. Elmore. Corn Era Hybrid Nutrient Concentration and Accumulation of Secondary and Micronutrients. Agron. J. 111 (2019):1-16. doi: 10.2134/agronj2018.09.0621.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Copyright Owner

The Authors

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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