Campus Units

Agronomy

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

10-10-2019

Journal or Book Title

Crop, Forage and Turfgrass Management

Volume

5

Issue

1

First Page

190024

DOI

10.2134/cftm2019.04.0024

Abstract

Land rolling is a common practice in the northern Great Plains and upper Midwest to push rocks to the soil surface after planting annual grain legumes and forage crops to protect harvest equipment despite the potential to increase weed density and soil erosion and decrease crop yield. Field trials were conducted in 2005 and 2006 to determine if land rolling the previous season influenced weed density or productivity of spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) planted following summer fallow or two crops planted the previous season, pea (Pisum sativum L.) and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Density of green foxtail [Setaria viridis (L.) Beauv.] and total weeds in spring wheat were influenced by year, planting date, and crop grown in the previous year, but land rolling had no influence on weed density. Yield of spring wheat was greater following summer fallow than following pea and barley, likely due to 0.9 inches greater available soil water at planting and 1.0 inch greater water use. Land rolling × previous crop interaction affected preplant soil water content with rolled fallow having 1.1 and 1.6 inches greater water content (0- to 4-ft depth) than rolled barley or pea, respectively; soil water content at planting did not vary for previous crop where no land rolling occurred. Spring wheat water productivity was 0.15 lb/acre-inch greater when the previous year’s crops were planted at the early date than when planting was delayed. Land rolling in the previous year did not influence weed density, grain yield, protein concentration, and water use or water productivity of spring wheat.

Comments

This article is published as Lenssen, A.W., and U.M. Sainju. 2019. Land Rolling Does Not Influence Productivity of Subsequent-Year Spring Wheat. Crop, Forage & Turfgrass Management 5:190024. doi: 10.2134/cftm2019.04.0024.

Rights

Works produced by employees of the U.S. Government as part of their official duties are not copyrighted within the U.S. The content of this document is not copyrighted.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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