Campus Units

Agronomy

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Accepted Manuscript

Publication Date

2016

Journal or Book Title

Soil and Sediment Contamination: An International Journal

Volume

25

Issue

2

First Page

164

Last Page

180

DOI

10.1080/15320383.2016.1112360

Abstract

Estrogens such as 17-β estradiol (E2) are endocrine-disrupting compounds and can affect the reproductive systems of aquatic organisms. Therefore, it is important to understand the mechanisms of their transport in the environment. E2 and its daughter product estrone (E1) are both strongly adsorbed by soil organic matter and have relatively short half-lives. Reduced contact time with soil make transport of E2 and E1 in soil more likely. In this study, intact soil cores from three soils representing a range of particle size distribution, structure, and organic matter content were used to compare the transport of E2 with and without the presence of colloidal material fractionated from soil or swine manure. In chemical transport experiments conducted with undisturbed soil columns, E2 and E1 were measured both in solution and attached to suspended solids in column effluent. During the transport experiments, colloids passed through, carrying E2, all soils with the exception of the sandy soil. The presence of colloids decreased the first detection time of E2 in the aqueous phase, was correlated with greater peak E2 concentrations in the effluent of both loamy and clayey soils, but not through the sandy soil, and increased mass fractions of the E2 that was transported.

Comments

This is a manuscript of an article published as Prater, Jacob R., Robert Horton, and Michael L. Thompson. "Impacts of Environmental Colloids on the Transport of 17 β-estradiol in Intact Soil Cores." Soil and Sediment Contamination: An International Journal 25, no. 2 (2016): 164-180. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Published Version

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