Campus Units

Agronomy, Geological and Atmospheric Sciences

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

2-2020

Journal or Book Title

Physics Today

Volume

73

Issue

2

First Page

26

Last Page

33

DOI

10.1063/PT.3.4407

Abstract

The Iowa landscape is endowed with rich, deep, dark soils that have high water-holding capacity. Because most of the state’s land is flat or gently rolling, agriculture can be practiced with large, efficient machinery. Historically, Iowa’s average climate is characterized by a growing season of about five to six months with favorable sunshine and warm temperatures. Its crop-dormant season has low enough temperatures to prevent overwintering of detrimental pests and pathogens. The seasonal cycle of precipitation has a spring–summer maximum and a winter minimum that generally provide a sufficient and timely supply of water to support high crop densities without the need for irrigation.

Comments

This article is published as Takle, Eugene S, and William J. Gutowski, Jr., 2020: Iowa’s agriculture is losing its Goldilocks climate. Physics Today 73, 2, 26-33. doi:10.1063/PT.3.4407. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

AIP Publishing

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS