Campus Units

Animal Science

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

1988

Journal or Book Title

Journal of Animal Science

Volume

66

Issue

7

First Page

1636

Last Page

1642

DOI

10.2134/jas1988.6671636x

Abstract

Sixty Duroc pigs, representing offspring of three lines from the fifth generation of divergent selection for leg weakness, were examined to determine correlated responses in joint angularity. The lines were low, control, and high, with the latter having superior front leg structure. At approximately 100 kg, 10 pigs of each sex and line were scored for front and rear leg structure and movement. The shoulder, elbow, carpal and hock joints were measured for resting angles and range of motion. The model to analyze the data included the effects of line, sire, sex and side and a covariable for weight. High-line pigs had significantly smaller (P < .05) resting angles of the elbow joint than did control- or low-line pigs. The low-line pigs, however, had significantly smaller resting angles at the carpal joint (P < .01) and greater resting angles at the hock joint (P < .05) than did control- or high-line pigs. The low-line pigs had fewer degrees extension at the elbow joint and fewer degrees flexion at the carpal joint than did control- or high-line pigs. High-line pigs had fewer degrees of flexion of the elbow joint than did control-or low-line pigs. Resting angles and range of motion for the elbow and carpal joints were less on the left side than on the right side. Males had greater degrees of extension and total degrees of movement at the elbow joint than did females. Selection for different degrees of leg weakness resulted in accompanying alterations in angularity of joints.

Comments

This is an article from Journal of Animal Science 66 (1988): 1636, doi:10.2134/jas1988.6671636x. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

American Society of Animal Science

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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