Campus Units

Animal Science

Document Type

Book Chapter

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

2017

Journal or Book Title

Ensuring safety and quality in the production of beef Volume 1 : Safety

First Page

145

Last Page

167

DOI

10.19103/AS.2016.0008.12

Abstract

Contamination of animal carcasses during slaughtering procedures is undesirable, but unavoidable in the conversion of live animals to meat for consumption. Internal muscle tissues are essentially sterile, and most initial contamination of red meat carcasses is contributed by the hide during removal (Elmonssalami and Wassef, 1971; Gill and Penny, 1979; Gill et al., 1976). The exposed surface of the hide and the hair accumulate dust, dirt and faecal material, and this is the primary source of bacterial contamination during slaughter (Ayres, 1955; Shotts et al., 1961). The factors that affect the extent of this contamination are reviewed by Patterson (1969) and Grau et al. (1968). Much of the microflora transferred to the tissue surfaces, while aesthetically undesirable, is nonpathogenic; however, pathogens such as Salmonella, Campylobacter and pathogenic Escherichia coli can be present.

Comments

This is a chapter from Dickson, J.S. and G.R. Acuff. 2017. Maintaining the Safety and Quality of Beef Carcass Meat. IN Ensuring safety and quality in the production of beef. Volume 1: Safety. 2017. Acuff, G.R. and J.S. Dickson (editors). Burleigh Dodds Science Publishing. Sawston, Cambridge, UK. doi: 10.19103/AS.2016.0008.12. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

Burleigh Dodds Science Publishing Limited

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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