Title

Effects of intrauterine and cervical artificial-insemination catheters on farrowing rate and litter size

Campus Units

Animal Science

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2008

Journal or Book Title

Journal of Swine Health and Production

Volume

16

Issue

1

First Page

10

Last Page

15

Abstract

Objectives: To determine the effects of type of artificial-insemination catheter on litter size and farrowing rate and to evaluate the economic differences between the two catheters on the basis of the differences observed in reproductive performance.

Materials and methods: Three hundred eighty-nine sows were allotted into two experimental groups by parity, body condition score, and breed-of-sire influence. Sow matings were performed using a disposable foam-tipped intrauterine catheter (IU, n = 193) or a cervical catheter (IC, n = 196). Total number of piglets born per litter was recorded, and farrowing rates were calculated after all sows had farrowed or returned to estrus.

Results: Farrowing rates were 67.8% and 66.3%, while total numbers of piglets born (mean ± SE) were 9.39 ± 0.55 and 9.74 ± 0.53 per litter for the IU and IC groups, respectively. Numbers of piglets born alive were 8.97 ± 0.54 and 9.29 ± 0.52 per litter for the IU and IC groups, respectively. Total numbers of piglets born per litter and farrowing rates in the IU and IC groups were not significantly different (P > .05). Estimated costs (US$) per pregnant sow, per pig born, and per pig born alive were $3.68, $0.36, $0.38, respectively, for the IU catheter and $0.60, $0.06, $0.06, respectively, for the IC catheter.

Implications: No performance difference is observed between groups inseminated using IU or IC methods. Since IU catheters are more expensive, the IC method of artificial insemination has an economic advantage under the conditions of this study.

Comments

This is an article from Fitzgerald, Robert F., Gordon F. Jones, and Kenneth J. Stalder. "Effects of intrauterine and cervical artificial-insemination catheters on farrowing rate and litter size." Journal of Swine Health and Production 16, no. 1 (2008): 10-15.

Copyright Owner

American Association of Swine Veterinarians

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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