Document Type

Article

Publication Date

6-2-2010

Journal or Book Title

Foodborne Pathogens and Disease

Volume

7

Issue

6

First Page

737

Last Page

740

DOI

10.1089/fpd.2009.0464

Abstract

Listeria monocytogenes has been repeatedly isolated from foods and food-processing facilities including food contact surfaces such as conveyor belts (CB). CBs are often difficult to clean and require rigorous sanitation programs for decontamination. Ultraviolet (UV) light has exhibited microbicidal properties on food contact surfaces and this study was conducted to determine the efficacy of UV against L. monocytogenes on CB made of different materials. A four-strain cocktail of L. monocytogenes (serotypes 3A, 4A, 4B, and 4C) was made to give a suspension of approximately 107 CFU/mL. CBs made from four different types of materials, (1) Ropanyl DM 8/2 A2 + 04 (belt 1), (2) Volta FRMW-3.0 (belt 2), (3) Volta FRMB-3.0 (belt 3), and (4) Ropanyl DM (belt 4), were inoculated with 1 mL of the four-strain cocktail (∼107 CFU/mL) of the bacterial suspension. CBs were treated with UV light (254 nm) for 1 and 3 sec at 5.53 and 5.95 mW/cm2. Three replications of the experiments were conducted. Two-way analysis of variance of survival populations of L. monocytogenes showed that bacterial counts were significantly reduced (p < 0.05) on all belt types irrespective of UV light intensities and times of exposure. L. monocytogenes populations were reduced (p < 0.05) to below detection limits on belts 1, 2, and 3 after exposure to 5.95 mW/cm2 UV light intensity for 3 sec. L. monocytogenes–inoculated CBs that were exposed to 5.53 mW/cm2showed higher (p < 0.05) survival populations of L. monocytogenes compared with 5.95 mW/cm2 on all the four CBs. Belt 4 showed survival populations of L. monocytogenes ranging from 1.42 to 1.73 log10 CFU/cm2 after UV light treatment for 1 and 3 sec. UV light can be effectively used to reduce L. monocytogenes contamination on CBs.

Comments

This article is from Foodborne Pathogens and Disease 7 (2010): 737–740, doi:10.1089/fpd.2009.0464.

Rights

This is a copy of an article published in the Foodborne Pathogens and Disease © 2010 copyright Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.; Foodborne Pathogens and Disease is available online at: http://online.liebertpub.com

Copyright Owner

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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