Campus Units

Animal Science

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Accepted Manuscript

Publication Date

9-2013

Journal or Book Title

Journal of Applied Physiology

Volume

115

Issue

5

First Page

660

Last Page

666

DOI

10.1152/japplphysiol.00252.2013

Abstract

Dystrophin-deficient muscles suffer from free radical injury, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, and inflammation, among other pathologies, which contribute to muscle fiber injury and loss leading to wheel chair confinement and death in the patient. For some time it has been appreciated that endurance training has the potential to counter many of these contributing factors. Correspondingly, numerous investigations have shown improvements in limb muscle function following endurance training in mdx mice. However, the effect of long-term volitional wheel running on diaphragm and cardiac function is largely unknown. Our purpose was to determine the extent to which long-term endurance exercise affected dystrophic limb, diaphragm and cardiac function. Following one year of volitional wheel running diaphragm specific tension was reduced by 60% (p

Comments

This is a manuscript of an article published as Selsby, Joshua T., Pedro Acosta, Meg M. Sleeper, Elisabeth R. Barton, and H. Lee Sweeney. "Long-term wheel running compromises diaphragm function but improves cardiac and plantarflexor function in the mdx mouse." Journal of Applied Physiology 115, no. 5 (2013): 660-666. doi: 10.1152/japplphysiol.00252.2013. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

American Physiological Society

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Published Version

Share

COinS