Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

2-22-2012

Journal or Book Title

Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry

Volume

60

Issue

7

First Page

1748

Last Page

1754

DOI

10.1021/jf204717v

Abstract

Demand is growing for meat products cured without the addition of sodium nitrite. Instead of the direct addition of nitrite to meat in formulation, nitrite is supplied by bacterial reduction of natural nitrate often added as vegetable juice/powder. However, the rate of nitrite formation in this process is relatively slow, and the total ingoing nitrite is typically less than in conventional curing processes. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of the rate of addition of nitrite and the amount of nitrite added on nitrosylation/nitrosation reactions in a model meat curing system. Myoglobin was preferentially nitrosylated as no decrease in sulfhydryl groups was found until maximum nitrosylmyoglobin color was achieved. The cysteine–myoglobin model retained more sulfhydryl groups than the cysteine-only model (p < 0.05). The rate of nitrite addition did not alter nitrosylation/nitrosation reactions (p > 0.05). These data suggest that the amount of nitrite but not the rate of addition impacts the nitrosylation/nitrosation reactions this system

Comments

Reprinted with permission from Journal of the American Chemical Society 60 (2012): 1748, doi:10.1021/jf204717v. Copyright 2012 American Chemical Society.

Rights

One-time permission is granted only for the use specified in your request. No additional uses are granted (such as derivative works or other editions). For any other uses, please submit a new request.

Copyright Owner

American Chemical Society

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS