Campus Units

Animal Science

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

2-1-1998

Journal or Book Title

Poultry Science

Volume

77

Issue

2

First Page

348

Last Page

355

DOI

10.1093/ps/77.2.348

Abstract

Oil emulsion and raw and cooked tissue homogenates were used to determine the mechanisms of various iron forms on the catalysis of lipid peroxidation. Flax oil (0.25 g) was blended with 160 mL maleate buffer (0.1 M, pH 6.5) to prepare an oil emulsion. Raw or cooked turkey leg meat was used to prepare meat homogenates. Samples were prepared by adding iron from each of the various sources, reactive oxygen species, or enzyme (xanthine oxidase and superoxide dismutase) systems into the oil emulsion or meat homogenates. In oil emulsion and cooked-meat homogenates, ferrous iron and hemoglobin had strong prooxidant effects, but ferritin became prooxidant only when ascorbate was present. Hemoglobin and ferritin had no prooxidant effect in raw-meat homogenates. The status of heme iron and the released iron from hemoglobin had little effect on the prooxidant effect of hemoglobin in oil emulsion and cooked meat homogenate systems. The prooxidant effect of ferrous iron in oil emulsion and cooked-meat homogenates disappeared in the presence of superoxide (.O2-), H2O2, or xanthine oxidase systems. In raw-meat homogenates, however, ferrous had strong prooxidant effects even in the presence of .O2-, or H2O2. The status of free iron was the most important factor in the oxidation of oil emulsion and cooked-meat homogenates but the impact in raw-meat homogenates was small.

Comments

This article is published as Ahn, D. U., and S. M. Kim. "Prooxidant effects of ferrous iron, hemoglobin, and ferritin in oil emulsion and cooked-meat homogenates are different from those in raw-meat homogenates." Poultry Science 77, no. 2 (1998): 348-355. doi:10.1093/ps/77.2.348.

Copyright Owner

Poultry Science Association Inc.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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