Campus Units

Biochemistry, Biophysics and Molecular Biology, Roy J. Carver Department of, Genetics, Development and Cell Biology

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

2019

Journal or Book Title

Cells

Volume

8

Issue

12

First Page

1603

DOI

10.3390/cells8121603

Abstract

Ribosomes are essential for protein synthesis in all organisms and their biogenesis and number are tightly controlled to maintain homeostasis in changing environmental conditions. While ribosome assembly and quality control mechanisms have been extensively studied, our understanding of ribosome degradation is limited. In yeast or animal cells, ribosomes are degraded after transfer into the vacuole or lysosome by ribophagy or nonselective autophagy, and ribosomal RNA can also be transferred directly across the lysosomal membrane by RNautophagy. In plants, ribosomal RNA is degraded by the vacuolar T2 ribonuclease RNS2 after transport by autophagy-related mechanisms, although it is unknown if a selective ribophagy pathway exists in plants. In this review, we describe mechanisms of turnover of ribosomal components in animals and yeast, and, then, discuss potential pathways for degradation of ribosomal RNA and protein within the vacuole in plants.

Comments

This article is published as Kazibwe, Zakayo, Ang-Yu Liu, Gustavo C. MacIntosh, and Diane C. Bassham. "The Ins and Outs of Autophagic Ribosome Turnover." Cells 8, no. 12 (2019): 1603. doi: 10.3390/cells8121603.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Copyright Owner

The Authors

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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