Campus Units

Biochemistry, Biophysics and Molecular Biology, Roy J. Carver Department of

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

2-15-2017

Journal or Book Title

ACS Chemical Biology

Volume

12

Issue

4

First Page

912

Last Page

917

DOI

10.1021/acschembio.6b01038

Abstract

The gibberellin (GA) phytohormones are produced not only by plants but also by fungi and bacteria. Previous characterization of a cytochrome P450 (CYP)-rich GA biosynthetic operon found in many symbiotic, nitrogen-fixing rhizobia led to the elucidation of bacterial GA biosynthesis and implicated GA9 as the final product. However, GA9 does not exhibit hormonal/biological activity and presumably requires further transformation to elicit an effect in the legume host plant. Some rhizobia that contain the GA operon also possess an additional CYP (CYP115), and here we show that this acts as a GA 3-oxidase to produce bioactive GA4 from GA9. This is the first GA 3-oxidase identified for rhizobia, and provides a more complete scheme for biosynthesis of bioactive GAs in bacteria. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses suggest that rhizobia acquired CYP115 independently of the core GA operon, adding further complexity to the horizontal gene transfer of GA biosynthetic enzymes among bacteria.

Comments

This article is published as Nett, Ryan S., Tiffany Contreras, and Reuben J. Peters. "Characterization of CYP115 as a gibberellin 3-oxidase indicates that certain rhizobia can produce bioactive gibberellin A4." ACS chemical biology 12, no. 4 (2017): 912-917. doi: 10.1021/acschembio.6b01038. Posted with permission.

Rights

This is an open access article published under an ACS AuthorChoice License, which permits copying and redistribution of the article or any adaptations for non-commercial purposes.

Copyright Owner

American Chemical Society

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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