Campus Units

Biomedical Sciences

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

10-2005

Journal or Book Title

Parasitology

Volume

131

Issue

S1

First Page

S129

Last Page

S142

DOI

10.1017/S0031182005009157

Abstract

Over the last decade the need for new strategies and compounds to control parasitic helminths has become increasingly urgent. The neuromuscular systems of these worms have been espoused as potential sources of target molecules for new drugs which may address this need. One facet of helminth neuromuscular biology which has garnered considerable research interest is that of neuropeptidergic neurotransmission, particularly regarding parasites of humans and animals, as well as free-living nematode model species. This research interest has been piqued by the fact that neuropeptides have been demonstrated to be fundamentally important to nematode biology and thus may be of utility in this search for new drug targets. This review focuses on the neuropeptide biology of plant parasitic nematodes, a subject which has been comparatively neglected despite the fact that the search for alternative control measures also extends to these economically important parasites. We focus on the FMRFamide-like peptide (FLP) neuropeptides and the complexity and distribution of this peptide family in plant parasitic nematodes. Possible roles for FLPs in plant parasitic nematode behaviour, as elucidated by a combination of molecular imaging techniques and RNA interference (RNAi), are discussed. We propose that disruption of FLP neurosignalling in plant parasitic nematodes represents a novel form of pest control and speculate as to how this may be achieved.

Comments

This article is from Parasitology 131 (2005): S129–S142, doi:10.1017/S0031182005009157. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

Cambridge University Press

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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