Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

1990

Journal or Book Title

Biochemical Systematics and Ecology

Volume

18

Issue

7-8

First Page

517

Last Page

528

DOI

10.1016/0305-1978(90)90123-W

Abstract

Gossypium darwinii Watt is a tetraploid cotton endemic to the Galapagos Islands. Opinion has been divided as to whether or not it deserves recognition at the specific rank, with some considering it a variety of its presumed progenitor, the widely distributed South American species G. barbadense L. A previous hypothesis states that much of the perceived intergradation between the two taxa arose as a consequence of introgression from G. barbadense following its introduction to the archipelago during the past several hundred years. We performed allozyme analysis on 58 accessions of G. darwinii from six islands, using 17 enzymes collectively encoded by 59 loci. Levels of variation were high for an island endemic, with a mean number of alleles per locus of 1.34 and an average panmictic heterozygosity of 0.062. Principal component analysis revealed clustering of accessions according to their island of origin, and a spatial pattern of island-clusters that approximates geographical relationships among islands. Genetic relationships of G. darwinii with G. barbadense and G. hirsutum L. were studied using previously generated allozyme data. Significant introgression of G. hirsutum alleles was detected; however morphological considerations support the hypothesis that much of G. darwinii's diversity stems from interspecific gene flow from G. barbadense, Evidence is presented suggesting that the occurrence of G. hirsutum alleles in G. darwinii derives not from direct hybridization, but from a mediated transfer through introduced, G. hirsutum-introgressed;G. barbadense. Gossypium darwinii and G. barbadense are nearly fixed for different alleles at four loci and each contains a large number of unique alleles. Notwithstanding the high interspecific Nei's genetic identity (0.949), the allozyme data support geographical and morphological evidence in suggesting that a specific rank for G. darwinii is warranted.

Comments

This article is from Biochemical Systematics and Ecology 18 (1990): 517, doi:10.1016/0305-1978(90)90123-W.

Rights

Works produced by employees of the U.S. Government as part of their official duties are not copyrighted within the U.S. The content of this document is not copyrighted.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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