Campus Units

Botany

Document Type

Conference Proceeding

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

1984

Journal or Book Title

Transactions of the Forty-ninth North American Wildlife and Natural Resources Conference

First Page

271

Last Page

280

Abstract

"Natural" waterfowl habitat management (Weller 1981) involves the use of natural forces (e.g., water levels, muskrat activity) to develop a mosaic of native plant communities, i.e., a habitat complex. Such a complex is designed to provide the nutritional and structural requirements for not only waterfowl, but also for a large variety of migratory bird and nongame species (Fredrickson and Taylor 1982). Natural management is less costly, more permanent, more esthetically pleasing, and provides more resources for wildlife than do standard agronomic practices (Fredrickson and Taylor 1982). Because natural marsh management is primarily the application of ecological principles, the successful development of a habitat complex requires a conceptual grasp of vegetation dynamics and a detailed understanding of the biological and physical factors that produce vegetation changes in wetlands.

Comments

This proceeding is from Pederson, R. L. and A. G. van der Valk. 1984. Vegetation change and seed banks in marshes: ecological and management implications. Transactions of the Forty-ninth North American Wildlife and Natural Resources Confernce, March 23-28, 1984, Boston, Massachusetts. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

Wildlife Management Institute

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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