Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

2006

Journal or Book Title

Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research

Volume

45

Issue

22

First Page

7427

Last Page

7434

DOI

10.1021/ie0605229

Abstract

Potassium-promoted iron oxide catalysts are used in large volume for the commercial ethylbenzene dehydrogenation to styrene process. Short-term deactivation of these catalysts, which is addressed by operating in excess steam, is thought to be caused due to reactive site loss through coking and/or reduction. However, the relative importance of the two mechanisms is not known. Presented are results concerning the reduction behavior of potassium-promoted iron oxide materials in the absence of carbon. Thermogravimetric experiments and X-ray diffraction analysis were used to examine the reduction behavior of potassium-promoted iron oxide materials. The reduction behavior was then compared with results from isothermal ethylbenzene dehydrogenation reactor studies under low steam-to-ethylbenzene operation. Potassium incorporation was found to stabilize the iron oxide against reduction apparently through the formation of KFeO 2. Chromium addition improved the reduction resistance, which gave good qualitative agreement with the dehydrogenation reaction studies. In contrast, vanadium incorporation led to more significant reduction as well as poor stability in the dehydrogenation reaction.

Comments

Reprinted (adapted) with permission from Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research 45 (2006): 7427, doi: 10.1021/ie0605229. Copyright 2006 American Chemical Society.

Copyright Owner

American Chemical Society

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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