Campus Units

Chemical and Biological Engineering, NSF Engineering Research Center for Biorenewable Chemicals

Document Type

Article

Research Focus Area

Advanced and Nanostructured Materials, Catalysis and Reaction Engineering

Publication Version

Accepted Manuscript

Publication Date

6-2014

Journal or Book Title

Chinese Journal of Catalysis

Volume

35

Issue

6

First Page

842

Last Page

855

DOI

10.1016/S1872-2067(14)60122-4

Abstract

The production of chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass provides opportunities to synthesize chemicals with new functionalities and grow a more sustainable chemical industry. However, new challenges emerge as research transitions from petrochemistry to biorenewable chemistry. Compared to petrochemisty, the selective conversion of biomass-derived carbohydrates requires most catalytic reactions to take place at low temperatures (< 300 °C) and in the condensed phase to prevent reactants and products from degrading. The stability of heterogeneous catalysts in liquid water above the normal boiling point represents one of the major challenges to overcome. Herein, we review some of the latest advances in the field with an emphasis on the role of carbon materials and carbon nanohybrids in addressing this challenge.

Comments

This is a manuscript of an article published as Matthiesen, John, Thomas Hoff, Chi Liu, Charles Pueschel, Radhika Rao, and Jean-Philippe Tessonnier. "Functional carbons and carbon nanohybrids for the catalytic conversion of biomass to renewable chemicals in the condensed phase." Chinese Journal of Catalysis 35, no. 6 (2014): 842-855. DOI: 10.1016/S1872-2067(14)60122-4. Posted with permission.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Copyright Owner

Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, the Chinese Academy of Sciences

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Published Version

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