Campus Units

Chemical and Biological Engineering, Genetics, Development and Cell Biology, Psychology

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Accepted Manuscript

Publication Date

2018

Journal or Book Title

Memory

Volume

26

Issue

5

First Page

683

Last Page

690

DOI

10.1080/09658211.2017.1397175

Abstract

Prior research by Hartwig and Dunlosky [(2012). Study strategies of college students: Are self-testing and scheduling related to achievement? Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 19(1), 126–134] has demonstrated that beliefs about learning and study strategies endorsed by students are related to academic achievement: higher performing students tend to choose more effective study strategies and are more aware of the benefits of self-testing. We examined whether students’ achievement goals, independent of academic achievement, predicted beliefs about learning and endorsement of study strategies. We administered Hartwig and Dunlosky’s survey, along with the Achievement Goals Questionnaire [Elliot, A. J., & McGregor, H. A. (2001). A 2 × 2 achievement goal framework. Journal of Personality & Social Psychology, 80, 501–519] to a large undergraduate biology course. Similar to results by Hartwig and Dunlosky, we found that high-performing students (relative to low-performing students) were more likely to endorse self-testing, less likely to cram, and more likely to plan a study schedule ahead of time. Independent of achievement, however, achievement goals were stronger predictors of certain study behaviours. In particular, avoidance goals (e.g., fear of failure) coincided with increased use of cramming and the tendency to be driven by impending deadlines. Results suggest that individual differences in student achievement, as well as the underlying reasons for achievement, are important predictors of students’ approaches to studying.

Comments

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Memory in 2018, available online at DOI: 10.1080/09658211.2017.1397175. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Published Version

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