Campus Units

Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Center for Nondestructive Evaluation (CNDE)

Document Type

Conference Proceeding

Conference

2017 IEEE International Conference on Environment and Electrical Engineering and 2017 IEEE Industrial and Commercial Power Systems Europe (EEEIC / I&CPS Europe)

Publication Version

Accepted Manuscript

Link to Published Version

https://doi.org/10.1109/EEEIC.2017.7977598

Publication Date

7-13-2017

Journal or Book Title

2017 IEEE International Conference on Environment and Electrical Engineering and 2017 IEEE Industrial and Commercial Power Systems Europe (EEEIC / I&CPS Europe)

Research Focus Area

Structural Engineering

DOI

10.1109/EEEIC.2017.7977598

Conference Date

June 6-9, 2017

City

Milan, Italy

Abstract

The monitoring of civil structures is critical in ensuring users' safety. Structural health monitoring (SHM) is the automation of this monitoring task. It is typically used to identify incipient damages through a spatio-temporal comparison in structural behaviors. Traditional sensors exhibit mechanical characteristics that are usually very different from those of the structures they monitor, which is a factor limiting their durability. Ideally, the material of a sensor would share the same mechanical characteristics as the material onto or into which it is installed. A solution is to fabricate multifunctional materials, capable of serving both structural and sensing functions, also known as smart materials. Recent developments in nanotechnologies have given us various engineered nanoparticles with enhanced mechanical and electrical capabilities. Among them, conductive piezoresistive nanopowders, such as carbon-based ones, show promise at developing smart materials. The nanofillers, spread into a structural material matrix, can provide the material with self-sensing capabilities. Such materials can then be used to detect variations in their external stresses or strains by detecting variations in their electrical characteristics, such as electrical resistivity and conductivity. This paper presents a new smart clay brick for strain sensing in masonry structures. The optimal fabrication process in terms of stability of the nanoparticles at high temperature and the electromechanical properties of the smart brick are investigated. Results show a clear strain sensitivity of the brick sensors subjected to external loads and show their promise for SHM applications.

Comments

This is a manuscript of a proceeding published as Ubertini, F., A. D'Alessandro, A. L. Materazzi, S. Laflamme, and A. Downey. "Novel nanocomposite clay brick for strain sensing in structural masonry." In Environment and Electrical Engineering and 2017 IEEE Industrial and Commercial Power Systems Europe (EEEIC/I&CPS Europe), 2017 IEEE International Conference on, pp. 1-4. IEEE, 2017. DOI: 10.1109/EEEIC.2017.7977598. Posted with permission.

Rights

Copyright 2017 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. Permission from IEEE must be obtained for all other uses, in any current or future media, including reprinting/republishing this material for advertising or promotional purposes, creating new collective works, for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or reuse of any copyrighted component of this work in other works.

Copyright Owner

IEEE

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Published Version

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