Campus Units

Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Accepted Manuscript

Publication Date

2-2014

Journal or Book Title

Earthquake Spectra

Volume

30

Issue

1

First Page

307

Last Page

334

DOI

10.1193/021713EQS036M

Abstract

The 2010–2011 Canterbury earthquakes in New Zealand revealed (1) improved structural response resulting from historical design advancements, (2) poor structural performance due to previously identified shortcomings that had been insufficiently addressed in design practice, and (3) new deficiencies that were not previously recognized because of premature failure resulting from other design flaws. This paper summarizes damage to concrete walls observed in the February 2011 Christchurch earthquake, proposes links between the observed response and specific design concerns, and offers suggestions for improving seismic design of walls in the following areas: amount of longitudinal reinforcement in wall end regions, suitable wall thickness to minimize the potential for out-of-plane buckling, and minimum vertical reinforcement requirements.

Research Focus Area

Geotechnical/Materials Engineering

Comments

This is a manuscript of an article published as Sritharan, Sri, Katrin Beyer, Richard S. Henry, Y. H. Chai, Mervyn Kowalsky, and Desmond Bull. "Understanding poor seismic performance of concrete walls and design implications." Earthquake Spectra 30, no. 1 (2014): 307-334. doi: 10.1193/021713EQS036M. Posted with permission.

Rights

Copyright 2014 Earthquake Engineering Research Institute. This article may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

Copyright Owner

Earthquake Engineering Research Institute

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Published Version

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