Campus Units

Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, Institute for Transportation

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

2020

Journal or Book Title

The Baltic Journal of Road and Bridge Engineering

Volume

15

Issue

1

First Page

211

Last Page

231

DOI

10.7250/bjrbe.2020-15.468

Abstract

Widened slabs, widely employed in many US states in concrete pavements, have suffered from unexpected longitudinal cracks. These cracks suddenly appeared within 0.60 m to 1.20 m from widened slab edges and could be detrimental to the long-term pavement performance. The primary objective of this study was to identify possible causes for such longitudinal cracking observed on widened concrete pavements. Both field investigation and Finite Element Analysis were performed. Degrees of curling and warping were measured using a Terrestrial Laser Scanner. Concrete cores were also extracted to achieve a better understanding of how the cracking had developed. Field survey and numerical simulation results indicate that such longitudinal cracks could be primarily caused by a combination of excessive traffic loads, a high degree of curling and warping, inadequate support from underlying layers, pavement ageing, and skewed joints. It was also found that 4.30 m widened slabs coupled with tied Portland Cement Concrete shoulders outperformed others in terms of producing less cracking, even when they had experienced higher levels of truck traffic. The sites constructed in late afternoons also showed significantly less longitudinal cracks.

Research Focus Area

Transportation Engineering

Comments

This article is published as Yang, Shuo, Yang Zhang, Orhan Kaya, Halil Ceylan, and Sunghwan Kim. "Investigation of Longitudinal Cracking in Widened Concrete Pavements." The Baltic Journal of Road and Bridge Engineering 15, no. 1 (2020): 211-231. DOI: 10.7250/bjrbe.2020-15.468. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

The Author(s)

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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