Campus Units

Chemistry, Ames Laboratory

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Accepted Manuscript

Publication Date

2-2017

Journal or Book Title

Journal of Catalysis

Volume

346

First Page

180

Last Page

187

DOI

10.1016/j.jcat.2016.12.018

Abstract

Ceria (CeO2) and sodium-modified ceria (Ce-Na) were prepared through combustion synthesis. Palladium was deposited onto the supports (Pd/CeO2 and Pd/Ce-Na) and their activity for the aqueous-phase transfer hydrogenation of phenol using 2-propanol under liquid flow conditions was studied. Pd/Ce-Na showed a marked increase (6×) in transfer hydrogenation activity over Pd/CeO2. Material characterization indicated that water-stable sodium species were not doped into the ceria lattice, but rather existed as subsurface carbonates. Modification of ceria by sodium provided more adsorption and redox active sites (i.e. defects) for 2-propanol dehydrogenation. This effect was an intrinsic property of the Ce-Na support and independent of Pd. The redox sites active for 2-propanol dehydrogenation were thermodynamically equivalent on both supports/catalysts. At high phenol concentrations, the reaction was limited by 2-propanol adsorption. Thus, the difference in catalytic activity was attributed to the different numbers of 2-propanol adsorption and redox active sites on each catalyst.

Comments

This is a manuscript of an article published as Nelson, Nicholas C., Brett W. Boote, Pranjali Naik, Aaron J. Rossini, Emily A. Smith, and Igor I. Slowing. "Transfer hydrogenation over sodium-modified ceria: Enrichment of redox sites active for alcohol dehydrogenation." Journal of Catalysis 346 (2017): 180-187. doi: 10.1016/j.jcat.2016.12.018. Posted with permission.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Copyright Owner

Elsevier Inc.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Published Version

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