Campus Units

Chemistry

Document Type

Book Chapter

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

2017

Journal or Book Title

Handbook of Solid State Chemistry

Volume

5

First Page

405

Last Page

489

DOI

10.1002/9783527691036.hsscvol5013

Abstract

This chapter discusses the various classes of hydride compounds, with a special focus on saline and metallic hydrides as well as oxyhydrides. It includes the following topics: thermodynamic stability, crystal chemistry, synthesis, and physical properties. The chapter also highlights recent progress in understanding hydride ion mobility in alkaline earth hydrides. It further deals with hydride compounds and in particular those containing alkali, alkaline earth, and transition and rare earth metals. The saline hydrides, that is, AH and AeH2 (with A=Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs; Ae=Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba) are proper ionic materials, in which hydrogen is present as hydride anions, H−. Saline hydrides show many similarities with their halide analogues, especially concerning crystal and electronic structures and, perhaps to a lesser extent, physical attributes such as brittleness, hardness, and optical properties.

Comments

This is a chapter from Miller, G. J., Zhang, Y., and Wagner, F. R., “Chemical Bonding in Solids,” Handbook of Solid State Chemistry. R. Dronskowski, S. Kikkawa and A. Stein (eds.), Volume 5, Chapter 12. Weinheim: Wiley-VCH. (2017): 405-489. DOI: 10.1002/9783527691036.hsscvol5013. Reproduced with permission.

Copyright Owner

Wiley‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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