Campus Units

Chemistry, Ames Laboratory

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Accepted Manuscript

Publication Date

2018

Journal or Book Title

Journal of the American Chemical Society

DOI

10.1021/jacs.8b10878

Abstract

The ubiquity of oxygen in organic, inorganic, and biological systems has stimulated the application and development of 17O solid-state NMR spectroscopy as a probe of molecular structure and dynamics. Unfortunately, 17O solid-state NMR experiments are often hindered by the combination of broad NMR signals and low sensitivity. Here, it is demonstrated that fast MAS and proton detection with the D-RINEPT pulse sequence can be generally applied to enhance the sensitivity and resolution of 17O solid-state NMR experiments. Complete 2D 17O→1H D-RINEPT correlation NMR spectra were typically obtained in fewer than 10 hours from less than 10 milligrams of material, with low to moderate 17O enrichment (less than 20%). 2D 1H-17O correlation solid-state NMR spectra allow overlapping oxygen sites to be resolved on the basis of proton chemical shifts or by varying the mixing time used for 1H-17O magnetization transfer. In addition, J-resolved or separated local field (SLF) blocks can be incorporated into the D-RINEPT pulse sequence to allow direct measurement of one-bond 1H-17O scalar coupling constants (1JOH) or 1H-17O dipolar couplings (DOH), respectively; the latter of which can be used to infer 1H-17O bond lengths. 1JOH and DOH calculated from planewave density functional theory (DFT) show very good agreement with experimental values. Therefore, the 2D 1H-17O correlation experiments, 1H-17O scalar and dipolar couplings, and planewave DFT calculations provide a method to precisely determine proton positions relative to oxygen atoms. This capability opens new opportunities to probe interactions between oxygen and hydrogen in a variety of chemical systems.

Comments

This document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a Published Work that appeared in final form in Journal of the American Chemical Society, copyright © American Chemical Society after peer review and technical editing by the publisher. To access the final edited and published work see DOI: 10.1021/jacs.8b10878. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

American Chemical Society

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Published Version

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