Campus Units

Chemistry, Ames Laboratory

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

2-1-2013

Journal or Book Title

Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters

Volume

4

Issue

4

First Page

653

Last Page

668

DOI

10.1021/jz302100r

Abstract

Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals possess unique properties that are unmatched by other chromophores such as organic dyes or transition-metal complexes. These versatile building blocks have generated much scientific interest and found applications in bioimaging, tracking, lighting, lasing, photovoltaics, photocatalysis, thermoelectrics, and spintronics. Despite these advances, important challenges remain, notably how to produce semiconductor nanostructures with predetermined architecture, how to produce metastable semiconductor nanostructures that are hard to isolate by conventional syntheses, and how to control the degree of surface loading or valence per nanocrystal. Molecular chemists are very familiar with these issues and can use their expertise to help solve these challenges. In this Perspective, we present our group's recent work on bottom-up molecular control of nanoscale composition and morphology, low-temperature photochemical routes to semiconductor heterostructures and metastable phases, solar-to-chemical energy conversion with semiconductor-based photocatalysts, and controlled surface modification of colloidal semiconductors that bypasses ligand exchange.

Comments

Reprinted (adapted) with permission from Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters 4 (2013): 653, doi: 10.1021/jz302100r. Copyright 2013 American Chemical Society.

Copyright Owner

American Chemical society

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Included in

Chemistry Commons

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