Campus Units

Chemistry

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

4-19-2003

Journal or Book Title

Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry

Volume

51

Issue

11

First Page

3502

Last Page

3507

DOI

10.1021/jf0211736

Abstract

Digestion of green plants in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract produces degradation products from chlorophyll that cause ingesta and feces to be highly fluorescent. This property was exploited for development and construction of instruments to noninvasively detect minute quantities of feces on meat samples in real time. The presence of feces on meat products is a primary source of foodborne pathogens, such as Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella. This new technology provides a rapid and accurate alternative to the practice of visual inspection and augments more time-consuming biological testing methods. This innovation can assist meat processors and government inspectors in their efforts to provide safe and wholesome food to consumers.

Comments

Reprinted (adapted) with permission from Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 51 (2003): 3502, doi: 10.1021/jf0211736. Copyright 2003 American Chemical Society.

Copyright Owner

American Chemical Society

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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