Campus Units

Community and Regional Planning

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

2008

Journal or Book Title

Planning and Changing Journal

Volume

39

Issue

1/2

First Page

98

Last Page

126

Abstract

Nationally, all districts, regardless of their size, face the challenge to ensure that all students have access to a quality education. However, some characterize the alternatives for rural families as being between schools that are too small or too far away, and for urban families as being between schools that are too large or too far away. State policies to equalize educational spending, cap bond and levy rates, require common teacher salary schedules, and consolidate school districts are geared toward improving quality and attempting to resolve problems of inefficiency. However, despite the use of the state policy to equalize educational quality, educational gaps persist. The most identifiable achievement differences between and among school districts are well documented and result from variations in (a) teacher quality; (b) teacher mobility; (c) student characteristics, like poverty, ethnicity, gender, and mobility; and (d) community wealth (Goldhaber & Anthony, 2004; Haselton, 2004; Parcel & Dufur, 2004; Uribe, 2003, 2004).

Comments

This article is published as Haddad, M., Alsbury, T., Using Spatial Analyses to Examine Student Proficiency: Guiding District Consolidation and Reform Policy Decisions. Planning and Changing Journal. 2008 39(1/2); 98-126. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

Illinois State University

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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