Campus Units

Community and Regional Planning

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Accepted Manuscript

Publication Date

4-2020

Journal or Book Title

Applied Geography

Volume

117

First Page

102186

DOI

10.1016/j.apgeog.2020.102186

Abstract

Numerous urban dwellers worldwide still live under residential segregation, which can act “as a poverty trap with job restrictions” (UN-Habitat, 2016, p. 79). Residential segregation occurs in a geographic space where individuals with similar socio-economic characteristics, such as income, are living close to each other and cut off from individuals of different socio-economic features. A clear understanding of the consequences that residential segregation has on poor people’s urban economic mobility is imperative to ensure that they move out of poverty. This is a pressing challenge for cities around the world, urging policy makers to deliver alternative solutions about planning-related topics such as housing, and transportation.

Comments

This accepted article is published as Haddad, M. (2020). Residential income segregation and commuting in a Latin American city. Applied Geography, 117, 102186. Doi: 10.1016/j.apgeog.2020.102186. Posted with permission.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Copyright Owner

Elsevier Ltd.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Available for download on Thursday, April 01, 2021

Published Version

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