Degree Type

Creative Component

Semester of Graduation

Summer 2018

Department

Agronomy

First Major Professor

Richard M. Cruse

Second Major Professor

Mark E. Westgate

Degree(s)

Master of Science (MS)

Major(s)

Agronomy

Abstract

Soil compaction can be defined as a reduction in porosity or an increase in bulk density resulting from external or internally applied forces (Alakukku, Laura, 2012). It is regarded with soil erosion, as the costliest and most serious environmental problem caused by conventional agriculture (FAO, 2003). Globally it is estimated that about 4% of agricultural lands or 64 million hectares are affected by compaction, with the majority of this associated with vehicular traffic (Flowers and Lal, 1998). The negative effects of soil compaction have been reported on nearly every continent in the world (Hamza and Anderson, 2005) and these effects have been shown to persist, especially at depth for periods of many years (Alakukku, 1996; Radford et al. 2007; Lowery and Schuler 1994; Logsdon et al. 1992; Hakansson et al. 1988).

Copyright Owner

Adam Gurr

File Format

application/pdf

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