Degree Type

Creative Component

Semester of Graduation

Spring 2020

Department

Community and Regional Planning

First Major Professor

Ted Grevstad-Nordbrock

Degree(s)

Master of Community and Regional Planning (MCRP)

Major(s)

Community and Regional Planning

Abstract

As the modern historic preservation movement and discipline soar past half a century old, communities across the United States are reevaluating their historic built environments and how those resources are being - or could be better - utilized. As preservation becomes an ever more important tool for planners nationwide, however, problems with how historic resource data is used, stored, and analyzed are becoming more abundant. In addition, not all communities are new to preservation – for some, the history of the built landscape has been ingrained into their identity for decades or more. This Creative Component used the unique Chicago suburb of Oak Park, Illinois as a case study and real-world application of preservation principles and practices to look at both factors. Using the author’s personal experience with the community and its government, this report argues that even in places that thrive off their use of historic preservation, there is still more to be done. This report also discusses how historic resource data is kept and organized, the problems with current processes, and potential solutions and ways to better utilize and manage data for the benefit of the village’s economy and community. Finally, as Oak Park’s vibrant architectural history creates much of its identity, five infographics about under-researched or overshadowed aspects of the village’s built history are included, as well as suggestions for further topics that could be explored to further explain to citizens and visitors alike the vast histories that Oak Park offers.

Copyright Owner

Fackler, Andrew

File Format

PDF

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