Title

Estimating the total ultrasound attenuation along the propagation path by using a reference phantom

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2010

Journal or Book Title

Journal of the Acoustical Society of America

Volume

128

Issue

5

First Page

3232

Last Page

3238

DOI

10.1121/1.3483739

Abstract

In this study, an algorithm previously developed for estimating the total ultrasonic attenuation along the propagation path from the surface of the transducer to a region of interest in tissue, was modified to make it more practical for use in clinical settings. Specifically, the algorithm was re-derived for when a tissue mimicking phantom rather than a planar reflector is used to obtain the reference power spectrum. The reference power spectrum is needed to compensate for the transfer function of the transmitted pulse, the transfer function of transducer, and the diffraction effects that result from focusing/beam forming. The modified algorithm was tested on simulated radio frequency echo lines obtained from two samples that have different scatterer sizes and different attenuation coefficient slopes, one of which was used as a reference. The mean and standard deviation of the percent errors in the attenuation coefficient estimates ACEs were less than 5% and 10%, respectively, for ROIs that contain more than 10 pulse lengths and more than 25 independent echo lines. The proposed algorithm was also tested on two tissue mimicking phantoms that have attenuation coefficient slopes of 0.7 dB/cm-MHz and 0.5 dB/cm-MHz respectively, the latter being the reference phantom. When a single element spherically focused source was used, the mean and standard deviation of the percent errors in the ACEs were less than 5% and 10% respectively for windows that contain more than 10 pulse lengths and more than 17 independent echo lines. When a clinical array transducer was used, the mean and standard deviation of the percent errors in the ACEs were less than 5% and 25%, respectively, for windows that contain more than 12 pulse lengths and more than 45 independent echo lines.

Comments

The following article appeared in The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 128 (2010): 3232 and may be found at doi:10.1121/1.3483739.

Rights

This article may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author and the Acoustical Society of America.

Copyright Owner

Acoustical Society of America.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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