Campus Units

Economics

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

2-2018

Journal or Book Title

RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences

Volume

4

Issue

2

First Page or Article ID Number

113

Last Page

130

DOI

10.7758/RSF.2018.4.2.06

Abstract

Although the central objective of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is to reduce food insecurity in the United States, the majority of SNAP households are food insecure. Higher benefits may lead these households to food security. To evaluate this possibility, we use a question from the Current Population Survey that asks respondents how much additional money they would need to be food secure. Food insecure SNAP households report needing an average of about $42 per week to become food secure. Under a set of assumptions about the measurement of benefits and behavioral responses, we find that an increase in weekly benefits of $42 for SNAP households would lead to a 62 percent decline in food insecurity at a cost of about $27 billion.

Comments

This article is published as Gundersen, Craig, Brent Kreider, and John V. Pepper. 2018. “Reconstructing the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program to More Effectively Alleviate Food Insecurity in the United States.” RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences 4(2): 113–30. DOI: 10.7758/RSF.2018.4.2.06.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

Copyright Owner

Russell Sage Foundation

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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