Campus Units

Animal Science, Economics

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

Spring 2017

Journal or Book Title

Journal of Applied Farm Economics

Volume

1

Issue

1

First Page or Article ID Number

1

Last Page

17

Abstract

This study provides valuable insights into cow-calf producer and feedlot operator succession plans for transferring cattle operations upon exiting the industry. Across both cow-calf producers and feedlot operators, about 50% expect to be raising cattle for 10 more years or less; however, about 39% of these producers do not have a succession plan in place. Cow-calf producers view a rural lifestyle, self-employment, working with livestock, and working with family as the biggest attractions to future generations entering beef cattle production. Cow-calf producers view environmental regulations, land tax policy, and expansion of corn and soybean acres as the biggest obstacles. Feedlot operators identified the same attractions as the cow-calf group; however, the highest-ranking obstacles were mostly different, except environmental regulations, and included work hours as well as labor availability and costs.

Comments

This article is published as Schulz, Lee L., Artz, Georgeanne M., and Gunn, Patrick J. 2017. "Succession Planning and Perceived Obstacles and Attractions for Future Generations Entering Beef Cattle Production," Journal of Applied Farm Economics 1(1):1-17. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

Purdue e-Pubs

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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