Campus Units

Economics, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

11-2020

Journal or Book Title

Agricultural Economics

Volume

51

Issue

6

First Page or Article ID Number

941

Last Page

958

DOI

10.1111/agec.12602

Abstract

This paper examines how comparative advantages of major beef exporters changed following the 2003 bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) outbreak, which significantly disrupted the U.S. beef trade until approximately 2007. Using longitudinal data on beef export values and constructed revealed comparative advantage measures, we show that while some measures of the long‐run impacts of BSE on U.S. beef export competitiveness have returned to pre‐2003 levels, the U.S.’s comparative advantage has not. We also examine a hypothetical scenario of no BSE event in 2003 and predict that in the absence of the BSE outbreak, the U.S. beef sector would have been increasingly more competitive by 2017 than it actually was. Long‐term trade competitiveness may not simply return to normal even after a short‐term disruption.

JEL Classification

F12, Q17

Comments

This article is published as Chen, Chen‐Ti, John M. Crespi, William Hahn, Lee L. Schulz, and Fawzi Taha. "Long‐run impacts of trade shocks and export competitiveness: Evidence from the US BSE event." Agricultural Economics 51, no. 6 (2020): 941-958. doi: 10.1111/agec.12602.

Rights

Works produced by employees of the U.S. Government as part of their official duties are not copyrighted within the U.S. The content of this document is not copyrighted.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Working Paper

Share

COinS