Title

Revisiting the relationship between longevity and lifetime education: global evidence from 919 surveys

Campus Units

Economics

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Submitted Manuscript

Publication Date

2019

Journal or Book Title

Journal of Population Economics

Volume

32

First Page or Article ID Number

551

Last Page

589

DOI

10.1007/s00148-018-0717-9

Abstract

The contrasting results from previous research motivate this reexamination of the longevity-schooling relationship. The study uses a different identification strategy applied to cohort-specific data from 919 household surveys conducted between 1960 and 2012 spanning 147 countries. We find a significant positive relationship between increased life expectancy at birth and lifetime completed years of schooling in 95% of the surveys and significant negative effects only in 0.3%. In addition, parents’ own longer life expectancy at birth has intergenerational benefits for their children’s schooling. The 31-year increase in life expectancy at birth worldwide for birth cohorts 1922–1987 is associated with 60–100% of the 4.8 additional years of completed schooling for those birth cohorts. These results are robust for different specifications across surveys, population groups, and world regions.

JEL Classification

J10, I15, O15

Comments

This is a working paper of an article published as Hoque, M.M., King, E.M., Montenegro, C.E. et al. Revisiting the relationship between longevity and lifetime education: global evidence from 919 surveys. J Popul Econ 32, 551–589 (2019). doi: 10.1007/s00148-018-0717-9.

Copyright Owner

Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Published Version

Share

COinS