Campus Units

Education, School of

Document Type

Presentation

Conference

International Conference on Mathematics/Science Education & Technology

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

2000

Conference Title

International Conference on Mathematics / Science Education and Technology 2000

Conference Date

2000

City

San Diego, CA

Abstract

In this paper college science instruction via the Internet is examined from three perspectives: students' on-line learning experiences; a comparative examination of learning on-line versus traditional instruction; and instructors' experiences teaching on-line. The setting was a freshman-level human anatomy / physiology course. Three students participated in a collective case study to describe the learning environment created by the Internet course. Motivation, computer savvy, and self-confidence were important to their success. A quantitative study of the on-line course and the traditional course evaluated the comparative effectiveness of the learning environments. Achievement scores and survey results indicated content understanding and retention were not effected, while desirable student study habits were used more frequently in the Internet section. To better understand the instructional implications of on-line courses, a case study was conducted. Internet instructor's time commitment and level of teaching satisfaction were high. The instructor's role changed, causing some lessening of job satisfaction.

Comments

Flickinger, K. & Hargrave, C. (2000). College Science via Internet: How effective is it?. In Proceedings of International Conference on Mathematics / Science Education and Technology 2000 (pp. 151-156). Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Posted with permission.

Rights

Copyright by AACE. Reprinted from the with permission of AACE (http://www.aace.org)

Copyright Owner

AACE

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Article Location

 
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