Campus Units

Education, School of

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Accepted Manuscript

Publication Date

Winter 2019

Journal or Book Title

Review of Higher Education

Volume

43

Issue

2

First Page

603

Last Page

632

DOI

10.1353/rhe.2019.0112

Abstract

Undergraduate students benefit from academic-centered peer interactions, especially in large lecture courses. However, little is known about how students come together and form relationships around a course. I conduct a mixed-methods study of students' peer networks to explore how students choose peers for academic-focused interactions. The network of connections among students in a large undergraduate physics class decreases over time, leaving students looking for study partners later in the course at a disadvantage. While community structure might limit relationship formation late in the semester, students who connected across campus capitalized on network internalities that facilitated opportunities for collaboration.

Comments

This article is published as Brown, M. The Push and Pull of Social Gravity: How Peer Relationships Form Around an Undergraduate Science Lecture., Review of Higher Education, Winter 2019, 43(2); 603-632. Doi: 10.1353/rhe.2019.0112. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

John Hopkins University Press

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Published Version

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