Campus Units

Education, School of

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

2019

Journal or Book Title

Journal of Curriculum Theorizing

Volume

34

Issue

3

First Page

136

Last Page

149

Abstract

POLITICAL SCIENTISTS HAVE DESCRIBED the eruption of recent political tensions as a post-WWII divide between Americans feeling a loss of economic security that requires more authoritarian responses and Americans who continue to prioritize equality, freedom, and democratic participation (Inglehart, 2018). The consequence of this fissure is augmented through recent alt-right marches on college campuses and in cities, enraged and misleading posting on social media, and hostile political elections. Emboldened by political discourses that are “openly racist, sexist, authoritarian and xenophobic” (Inglehart, 2018, p. 25), Orwellian tools of misinformation have emerged that serve to disrupt the civil and trustworthy deliberations inherent to liberal democracies. For social studies educators, the current “post-truth” era that encompasses hatred towards Black, Latinx, queer, Muslim, Jewish, and immigrant communities should prompt decisive action. Unfortunately, in many elementary classrooms, the topic of immigration is rarely addressed beyond Ellis Island, and that curriculum typically avoids conversations about exclusionary, xenophobic, and racist laws that barred and severely restricted the entry of multiple ethnic and racial groups for over a century and continue into the present (Graff, 2010; Rodríguez, 2015).

Comments

This article is published as Rodríguez, N. N. & Salinas, C. S. (2019). "La lucha todavía no ha terminado/The struggle is not yet over: Teaching immigration through testimonio and difficult funds of knowledge. Journal of Curriculum Theorizing, 34(3), 136-149. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

Foundation for Curriculum Theory

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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