Campus Units

Education, School of

Document Type

Book Review

Publication Version

Accepted Manuscript

Publication Date

4-3-2019

Journal or Book Title

Community College Journal of Research and Practice

Volume

43

Issue

4

First Page

317

Last Page

318

DOI

10.1080/10668926.2018.1549070

Abstract

Community colleges have long been regarded as the common entry point to postsecondary education for low-income students. However, researchers often mention “low-income students” without a clear definition of what that means, except perhaps that the students in their study received Pell Grants and other types of financial aid. Terina Roberson Lathe provides a better understanding of what it means to be a working class student pursuing a community college degree beyond the “low-income” or “Pell Grant eligible” labels to show how these students are perceived by the faculty who teach them. Lathe argues that the education system privileges students in the middle to upper classes and to continue to ignore class-based differences is to continue to underserve students who already face enormous challenges in schools.

Comments

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Community College Journal of Research and Practice on April 3, 2019, available online at DOI: 10.1080/10668926.2018.1549070 Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Published Version

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