Campus Units

Education, School of

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

2016

Journal or Book Title

Journal of Student Affairs Inquiry

Volume

1

Issue

2

First Page

1

Last Page

22

Abstract

With increased pressure to justify their work, student affairs professionals no longer question the need to engage in assessment (Schuh, 2013). Assessment activities within student affairs have increased dramatically in the past decades, but many of these activities focus on measuring participation and satisfaction. Although important, these activities neglect to answer a more important question: How do student affairs professionals contribute to student learning? (Schuh, 2013; Schuh & Gansemer-Topf, 2010). Despite the increased need to do assessment, many student affairs professionals continue to struggle with ways to measure student learning (Blimling, 2013; Bresciani, 2013; Bresciani, Gardner, & Hickmott, 2009). In this paper, we introduce the reader to one approach, phenomenography, which can be used to document learning in student affairs.

Comments

This is an article from Journal of Student Affairs Inquiry 1 (2016): 1. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

Student Affairs Assessment Leaders

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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