Campus Units

Education, School of

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Accepted Manuscript

Publication Date

2-2016

Journal or Book Title

Research in Higher Education

Volume

57

Issue

7

First Page

823

Last Page

844

DOI

10.1007/s11162-016-9409-z

Abstract

Students’ lives outside of college can have dramatic effects on academic outcomes (e.g., grades, persistence, graduation). However, the manner in which students’ lives outside of college are referenced in college-effects models suggests some uncertainty among scholars as to which, and how, student experiences outside of an institution affect college student outcomes. Using longitudinal data from a racially diverse sample of 3914 students (997 White, 1051 Black, 915 Hispanic, and 951 Asian) attending 28 institutions, this study employs logistic regression models to examine relationships between three types of non-college life-events and students’ likelihood of graduation. Specifically, we examine the impact of financial disruptions, grieving a friend’s or family member’s death, and other family situations that likely cause psychological distress for students. Results suggest that major life-events are both common (i.e., affecting over 52 % of students) and consequential (i.e., negatively affecting graduation rates), thus warranting increased attention from researchers, policy-makers, and practitioners.

Comments

This is a manuscript of an article published as Cox, Bradley E., Robert D. Reason, Samantha Nix, and Megan Gillman. "Life Happens (Outside of College): Non-College Life-Events and Students’ Likelihood of Graduation." Research in Higher Education 57, no. 7 (2016): 823-844. The final publication is available at link.springer.com via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11162-016-9409-z. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

Springer Science+Business Media New York

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Published Version

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