Campus Units

Education, School of

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

Spring 2018

Journal or Book Title

The Journal of Negro Education

Volume

87

Issue

2

DOI

10.7709/jnegroeducation.87.2.0140

Abstract

Despite claims that colleges and universities are isolated from ideological preferences, sociopolitical discourse regularly shapes policies and practices of postsecondary education. This article considers how national discourse on federal aid for postsecondary education during the 1970s reflected a monumental shift in higher education policy. Specifically, we critique neoliberalism, a tenet of Critical Race Theory (CRT), to examine key testimonies from six expert educational leaders during a 1978 hearing on the Middle Income Student Assistance Act (MISAA). The key testimonies examined in this article highlight how language shifted the focus of national discourse on federal financial aid from public to private good, and from equal opportunity for traditionally underrepresented populations to equitable education for all.

Comments

This article is published as Burt, B.A., Baber, L.D., The Power of Language: Exploring Foundations of Neoliberalism in Federal Financial Aid Policy. The Journal of Negro Education; 2018 87(2); DOI: 10.7709/jnegroeducation.87.2.0140. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

School of Education, Howard University

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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