Campus Units

Education, School of

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

9-17-2018

Journal or Book Title

School Science and Mathematics

First Page

1

Last Page

14

DOI

10.1111/ssm.12294

Abstract

The development of talent in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields remains a national priority, one for which increasing the number of STEM participants from historically underrepresented populations is germane. Increasing the number of historically underrepresented students who complete advanced degrees in STEM will not only aid in solving national problems such as building infrastructure and strengthening national security, but also provide more models of success for future generations. Addressing this priority requires developing a better understanding of what leads students into and through STEM pathways, and finding ways to eliminate systemic barriers to their participation in STEM. This study reports on the origins of early STEM interest among 30 Black male graduate students in engineering. Using a community cultural wealth perspective, this article uncovers the people and activities that nurtured students into and through STEM pathways. The findings from this study provide clues to the social support and activities necessary for early interest in STEM.

Comments

This article is published as Burt,B.A., Johnson, J.T., Origins of early STEM interest for Black male graduate students in engineering: A community cultural wealth perspective. School Science and Mathematics. 2018, DOI: 10.1111/ssm.12294. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

School Science and Mathematics Association

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Available for download on Thursday, September 17, 2020

Published Version

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