Campus Units

Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology, Statistics

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

8-2017

Journal or Book Title

The American Naturalist

Volume

190

Issue

2

First Page

292

Last Page

297

DOI

10.1086/692471

Abstract

The natural history of organisms can have major effects on the tempo and mode of evolution, but few examples show how unique natural histories affect rates of evolution at macroevolutionary scales. European plethodontid salamanders (Plethodontidae: Hydromantes) display a particular natural history relative to other members of the family. Hydromantes commonly occupy caves and small crevices, where they cling to the walls and ceilings. On the basis of this unique and strongly selected behavior, we test the prediction that rates of phenotypic evolution will be lower in traits associated with climbing. We find that, within Hydromantes, foot morphological traits evolve at significantly lower rates than do other phenotypic traits. Additionally, Hydromantes displays a lower rate of foot morphology evolution than does a nonclimbing genus, Plethodon. Our findings suggest that macroevolutionary trends of phenotypic diversification can be mediated by the unique behavioral responses in taxa related to particular attributes of their natural history.

Comments

This article is published as Dean C. Adams, Dana Korneisel, Morgan Young, and Annamaria Nistri, "Natural History Constrains the Macroevolution of Foot Morphology in European Plethodontid Salamanders," The American Naturalist 190, no. 2 (August 2017): 292-297. doi: 10.1086/692471. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

The University of Chicago

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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