Campus Units

Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Accepted Manuscript

Publication Date

3-30-2020

Journal or Book Title

Global Change Biology

DOI

10.1111/gcb.15100

Abstract

Oxygen (O2) limitation is generally understood to suppress soil carbon (C) decomposition and is a key mechanism impacting terrestrial C stocks under global change. Yet, O2 limitation may differentially impact kinetic or thermodynamic vs. physico-chemical C protection mechanisms, challenging our understanding of how soil C may respond to climate-mediated changes in O2 dynamics. Although O2 limitation may suppress decomposition of new litter C inputs, release of physico-chemically protected C due to iron (Fe) reduction could potentially sustain soil C losses. To test this tradeoff, we incubated two disparate upland soils that experience periodic O2 limitation—a tropical rainforest Oxisol and a temperate cropland Mollisol—with added litter under either aerobic (control) or anaerobic conditions for one year. Anoxia suppressed total C loss by 27% in the Oxisol and by 41% in the Mollisol relative to the control, mainly due to the decrease in litter-C decomposition. However, anoxia sustained or even increased decomposition of native soil-C (11.0% vs. 12.4% in the control for the Oxisol and 12.5% vs. 5.3% in the control for the Mollisol, in terms of initial soil C mass), and it stimulated losses of metal- or mineral-associated C. Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy demonstrated that anaerobic conditions decreased protein-derived C but increased lignin- and carbohydrate-C relative to the control. Our results indicate a tradeoff between physico-chemical and kinetic/thermodynamic C protection mechanisms under anaerobic conditions, whereby decreased decomposition of litter C was compensated by more extensive loss of mineral-associated soil C in both soils. This challenges the common assumption that anoxia inherently protects soil C and illustrates the vulnerability of mineral-associated C under anaerobic events characteristic of a warmer and wetter future climate.

Comments

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Huang, W., C. Ye, W. Hockaday, and S. J. Hall. "Tradeoffs in soil carbon protection mechanisms under aerobic and anaerobic conditions." Global change biology (2020), which has been published in final form at doi: 10.1111/gcb.15100. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.

Copyright Owner

John Wiley & Sons Ltd

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Available for download on Tuesday, March 30, 2021

Published Version

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