Campus Units

English

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

1990

Journal or Book Title

College English

Volume

52

Issue

1

First Page

52

Last Page

73

Abstract

Literacy instruction or the lack of it has a wide range of social consequencespolitical, economic, cultural. These consequences are most obvious when the members of some community are forbidden by law to learn to read-as, for example, blacks were in states of the antebellum South-in order to prevent them from raising their social standing and posing a political, economic, or cultural threat to the dominant community. More subtle but equally pervasive consequences stem from restrictions on advanced forms of literacy. In modern urbanindustrial society, less visible barriers to achieving advanced literacy also preserve the integrity and status of existing communities and limit access to coveted social roles. That process, however, like modern society itself, is much more complex than the crude legal bans on literacy common in agrarian societies.

Comments

Published as Russell, David R. "Writing across the curriculum in historical perspective: Toward a social interpretation." College English52, no. 1 (1990): 52-73. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

National Council of Teachers of English

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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