Campus Units

English

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

2010

Journal or Book Title

Research in the Teaching of English

Volume

44

Issue

4

First Page

406

Last Page

434

Abstract

The concepts of drafting and revision were developed out of process theory and research done in the early 1980s, an era when word processing was not as pervasive or standardized as it is now. This paper reexamines those concepts, drawing on an analysis of two decades of previous collegelevel studies of writing processes in relation to word processing and an exploratory survey of 112 upper level undergraduate students who use computers extensively to write and revise. The results support earlier studies that found students' revision is predominantly focused on local issues. However, the analysis suggests that the common classroom practice of assigning multiple drafts to encourage global revision needs to be rethought, as more drafts are not necessarily associated with global revision. The survey also suggests that printing out to revise may be on the decline. Finally, the analysis suggests the very concept of a draft is becoming more fluid under the influence of word processing. The study calls for further research on students' drafting and revision practices using more representative surveys and focused qualitative studies.

Comments

Published as Dave, Anish M., and David R. Russell. "Drafting and revision using word processing by undergraduate student writers: Changing conceptions and practices." Research in the Teaching of English (2010): 406-434. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

National Council of Teachers of English

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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