Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2011

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Jason Chan

Abstract

Prior research has shown that testing can impair subsequent recall of nontested materials: an effect termed retrieval-induced forgetting. In the current study, I examined the effect of providing feedback during retrieval practice on the later recall of these nontested materials. In two experiments, I varied the type of feedback administered during retrieval practice (no feedback, immediate feedback, delayed feedback). Experiment 1 used cued recall as the final test, and Experiment 2 used recognition as the final test. As expected, providing immediate or delayed feedback (compared to no feedback) improved recall of tested materials. More importantly, Experiment 1 showed that providing immediate and delayed feedback did not increase the magnitude of retrieval-induced forgetting in a cued recall final test. Experiment 2 found that feedback reduced retrieval-induced forgetting in a recognition final test. From a practical perspective, these results indicate that feedback does not exacerbate retrieval-induced forgetting. This finding is encouraging for students and educators who use testing to help improve learning. From a theoretical perspective, these results provide support for the inhibitory account of retrieval-induced forgetting.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/etd-180810-1295

Copyright Owner

Matthew Erdman

Language

en

Date Available

2012-04-06

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

60 pages

Included in

Psychology Commons

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