Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2011

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Educational Leadership and Policy Studies

First Advisor

Nancy Evans

Second Advisor

Ryan Gildersleeve

Abstract

While the number of Muslim college students in increasing, (Rasheed Ali & Bagheri, 2009), many are facing a severe misunderstanding of their faith that has been further distorted since 9/11 (Afridi & Carnegie Corp. of New York, 2001). This qualitative study focused on understanding the personal and religious experiences of four Muslim women in the context of a large research university in the Midwest United States. Using Siedman's (1991) three-interview series, all participants were interviewed three times as the primary means of data collection. Based on analysis of the collected data, three themes emerged as central to the participants' experiences: the role of prayer is varied but important, the influence of family in religious identity and expression, and the impact of environments on students' experiences and identity. The findings from this study provide examples and stories that will allow student affairs professionals and faculty members to better understand Muslim students. The findings from this study also lead to implications for creating inclusive learning environments for all students.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/etd-180810-2102

Copyright Owner

Allison Jane Severson

Language

en

Date Available

2012-04-06

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

125 pages

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